History Turmoil And Politico-Cultural Conditions of the Sub-Continental Men In Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children

  • Gunasekaran N PG & Research Department of English,Sri Vidya Mandir Arts & Science College, Uthangarai, India – 636 902
  • Bhuvaneshwari S PG & Research Department of English,Sri Vidya Mandir Arts & Science College, Uthangarai, India – 636 902

Abstract

Salman Rushdie remains a major Indian writer in English. His birth coincides with the birth of a new modern nation on August 15, 1947. He has been justly labelled by the critics as a post-colonial writer who knows his trade well. His second novel Midnight’s Children was published in 1981 and it raised a storm in the hitherto middle class world of fiction writing both in English and in vernaculars. Rushdie for the first time burst into the world of fiction with subversive themes like impurity, illegitimacy, plurality and hybridity. He understands that a civilization called India may be profitably understood as a dream, a collage of many colours, a blending of cultures and nationalities, a pluralistic society and in no way unitary.

Published
2015-10-30